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Chess makes you Smart
Great Chess Minds 
make Great Students!

Tournaments (January 2009) 

Date    
   
Tournament  
   
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10 - 11 January   
   

Pesta Catur USM (Individual)   

   

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17 - 18 January 
    

Pesta Catur USM (Team)   
    

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18 January   
  
  
11th CAS-Octagon First Quarter    Allegro Championship 2009  
 
    
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PISA Chess Challenge    
21 December 2008

                 Candidate Master Collin Madhavan created a new Chess record for the Malaysia Book of Records “The Most Consecutive Chess Games Played” in Penang today. In total, Collin played 101 games against players whose ages ranged from seven to fifty plus. The majority of the participants were from Penang island. There were also 5 students from University Sains Malaysia and 5 foreigners from Canada and Vietnam. The match that lasted 8 hours and 40 minutes, saw Collin winning 69, drawing 29 and losing the remaining 3 games to Poh Ker Haw, Teh De Juan & Chen Pei Xian. The final match result was 83.5 to 17.5 in favour of the Chess master with a winning percentage of 83%.  

                This event, which has been endorsed by the Malaysia Book of Records and the Penang State Government, was held at the Penang International Sports Arena (PISA). The event was free of charge and  open to the public. All participants received a certificate of participation and a gift each, which included chess bags, chess boards and Chess Books. The event, which is organized by AsiaFairs Sdn Bhd, was one of the highlights for the Penang International Book Fair that is being held at PISA from the 16th to the 21st of December 2008. The AsiaFairs Sdn Bhd, the Penang Chess Association and Quantum Corporation Sdn Bhd were the main sponsors for this event.

                Collin said, ”Playing conditions were excellent and thanks to the Penang Chess Association, updated results as well as players names were displayed prominently at the playing hall.”  

                He also added that “Chess should be played by all as it is easy to learn and compared to other sports, cheap. One of the best reasons to play Chess is to keep the mind active, no matter what one’s age, and by playing regularly, develop memory power. “ 


Left to right: PS Lim (Penang Chess Association), Tan Eng Seong (Penang Chess Association),  
Collin Madhavan, Steven Thong (AsiaFairs Sdn Bhd), Vic (Quantum Corp. Sdn Bhd.) 
& Peter Yong (AsiaFairs Sdn Bhd).

                       This simultaneous Chess match is part of the Budi Chess Program, which is a grand plan to promote Chess to the masses.  For the record, Budi has organized a number of such simultaneous Chess matches in 5 states in Malaysia: KL (Aug. 2007, Dec. 2007), Perak (Sept. 2007), Trengganu (Jan. 2008), Negeri Sembilan (May 2008) and Penang (Dec. 2008). Sponsors of these events so far include the Trengganu State Government, IJM Bhd, RB Land, Quantum Corporation Sdn Bhd, AsiaFairs Sdn Bhd, the Perak State Association, the Negeri Sembilan State Association, Sekolah Sri Garden, the Penang State Association, The Switch Sdn Bhd, Kids for Chess Program and Imagine Software.

                      The world record stands at 1,131 games and was set by Grandmaster Susan Polgar in 2005.

Collin: I'd like to thank the organisers, Asiafairs Sdn Bhd, for promoting Chess at The Penang Book Fair. A word of thanks to Mr. Steve Ho from Quantum Corporation Sdn Bhd for coming in as a sponsor and friend of Chess. And finally, my friends Tan Eng Seong, PS Lim and Tan Eu Hong from the Penang Chess Association, without whose help and assistance, this event wouldn't have been such a great and well-organised Chess event!! 

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more pictures


  4th Kids for 
Chess Camp 
(26 & 27 Nov.2008)

More details on the 4th Kids for Chess Camp 2008 in the next issue. 

                       

Chess Puzzles 

#47   

White to play and win.    

#48

White to play and win. 

Solution:  

     

 

 

1. Rxh6 gxh6 2. Nxf6 1 – 0 [1. ...... Kg8 2. Nxf6 Kf7 3. Qg6 #] Treybal – Henneberger 1928

Solution:     
  

    

   

 

1. Re8 Kb7 2. Qc6 Bxc6 3. dxc6 Ka7 4. Nb5 1 – 0 Nesis – Nikolaev 1976         

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